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  • Historian. Genealogist. Writer. Why not? Ask what you want to know!

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October 17, 2012

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Salima Masud

Corey, another jewel of a piece of history. I always had great respect for women of the night. Great story.

Salima Masud

Derrick from Philly

Great article, Corey! And as usual, great photographs.


Was it Lulu White who sent her boyfriend out to a small undeveloped town called Los Angeles with $100,000 cash to buy up as much property as possible. This was when the movie industry was making it's move from New Jersey to California. Well, the boyfriend disappeared of course. And Lulu never became one of the largest real estate owners in southern California.

The story's suppose to be true, and I think it was Lulu, but it could have been one of the other madams. Some of them actually retired with money and property.

And, Corey, you know I'm fascinated with the Gays and drag queens that you mentioned who hung out Uptown (in Black neighborhoods, of course--and we're supposed to be so homophobic).

Jahlaune

A most enjoyable read

Corey

@Salima, so do I, but I have never really known why. It's not emphathy or symphathy - maybe it's a knowing, a sense of connection to being an out-cast in society, or even based on experience when I've played the whore?!

@Derrick, yes, it's Lulu White who COULD have become a major financial player in early Hollywood and lost it all. Ah, those pimps! So short-sighted and vicious! I believe Countess Willie Piazza, Lulu's friend and fellow madam was able to settle into a comfortable life in her later years. And GOOD FOR HER! By the way, they were neighbors with Piazza running a much, much smaller establishment. They both specialized in these "octoroon" girls. But Piazza was known as a LADY while White was "uncouth." Both Piazza and her girls were known as trendsetters in the society as a whole!

Oh, and Derrick ..........THANK YOU for your loyalty and support of this blog! I appreciate you and the other brothers who hang in there with me.

@Jahlaune ......... thank you, sir! I appreciate that!

Derrick from Philly

Thank YOU, Corey, for this wonderful blog. I've told a number of friends about it, and they've visited here and praised it. B.tches just too scared to post a comment. I aint.

Greg

Corey, once again, you have done the DAMNED thing or thang!LOL. Anyway, I want to know more about the homosexually oriented brothels, now there is a story to be told! Its just something I've always believed had been around

One is also curious about gay life for African Americans during slavery. Now there is definitely a story to be told!

KBR

Holy Moly! What a story. And what a wonderful way you have with words Corey. Superbly interesting bit of history. I remember a song about Storyville from the 1947 movie New Orleans sung by Billie Holiday but I never knew much about Storyville until now. Thanks for sharing so much of your historic knowledge with us uninformed folk! As a GBM you make me proud.

KBR in Philly

bama

loved it

Dag Olavssön

This site is a pleasant surprise. Thank you very much!

Splendor

Very interesting story and as a fellow history buff who hails from New Orleans I'm excited to have found this blog!!

Hael MUGHRABI

Just very beautiful and informative for all people interested in early New Orleans style and life

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